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StarKist Pleads Guilty To Price Fixing In Alleged Collusion In Canned Tuna Industry

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A StarKist brand product is seen on a grocery store shelf. Authorities say StarKist has agreed to plead guilty to price fixing as part of a broad collusion investigation of the industry.

Three companies — StarKist, Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee — are accused by the government of conspiring to keep their canned tuna prices high.

(Image credit: Lisa Poole/AP)

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CallMeWilliam
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diannemharris
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fxer
3 days ago
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COLLUSION FOUND, Russian ass looking Charlie Tuna
Bend, Oregon

Peer pressure your friends into voting with Outvote

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Boing Boing is proud to welcome Outvote.io as a sponsor.

Want to get Dems and progressives elected in the 2018 midterm elections? In 5 minutes? From your couch? There’s an app for that.

The majority of registered voters missed the last midterm. Unsurprisingly, most people won’t admit it. Young people are the worst when it comes to pretending that they’ve voted.

So how can we get people into the voting booth this November? It turns out that reminding your friends to vote is surprisingly effective.

The bottom line is that people trust their friends. If your longtime pal tells you something about a candidate, you’re much more likely to trust their opinion than a TV ad. In fact, during the 2018 primaries, friends that got a single text via Outvote became 10% more likely to vote.

The Outvote app shows you which of your contacts have missed a recent election by matching them to publicly available voting data provided by the state they live in. It then makes it easy to send reminders to everyone that needs them.

The app will even tell you which of your friends live in the critical swing districts that are needed to take back the House this November.

The average person has about 500 contacts. You could easily have 50 votes sitting in your pocket that aren’t going to show up unless you text them.

MoveOn, Swing Left, Flippable and Democratic State Parties across the country are all using Outvote to get Democrats and progressives to the polls this year.

Candidates spend millions of dollars making attack ads and promo reels in an attempt to win you over, but when it comes to actually getting people to vote the effects are small and short-lived. What reliably gets folks to the polls is conversations between real people, especially between people who already know each other. It’s not that crazy when you think about it.

If you searched through the voter rolls during the last election and sent reminders to all of your friends, you’re a national treasure.

If you didn’t, download the Outvote app and get your friends to the polls.

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diannemharris
3 days ago
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With 19 Days to Midterms, Georgia Is Rejecting Ballots Over Handwriting

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Georgia’s signature-match laws deprive voters of due process. We’re suing.

Early voting in Georgia for the 2018 general election just kicked off on Monday, but already the state has rejected close to 600 absentee ballots or applications for an absentee ballot.

One culprit?

State laws that require election officials to reject all absentee ballots and absentee ballot applications if they believe that signatures within the voter’s paperwork do not match each other.

The elections’ officials making these determinations do not have any formal education or training to analyze people’s handwriting, and are not given any unifying instructions on what should constitute a mismatch. It’s left entirely up to them, a layperson. Georgia does not notify voters before their ballots are rejected nor does it provide them an opportunity to contest the determination.

To throw out someone’s ballot — without any prior notice or chance to appeal — is a clear due process violation. That’s why we, with the ACLU of Georgia, are suing Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp and all county registrars on behalf of the Georgia Muslim Voter Project, an organization that will have to divert voter turnout resources into educating the public about the risk of being disenfranchised over handwriting.

With midterms only 19 days away, there is no time to waste. We’re asking the court to order Georgia to give impacted voters the opportunity to confirm their identity or otherwise resolve the alleged discrepancy before their ballots are rejected. The court has set a hearing date of Tuesday, Oct. 23.

It’s a simple solution and one that the state should be familiar with, given that Georgia already implements these types of due process protections for voters in similar situations. In fact, for absentee voters whose ballots are being challenged because they are allegedly unqualified to vote, the state not only provides notice of the challenge but a hearing on a rushed time frame and an opportunity to appeal the finding before a judge.

To not extend the same due process protection to voters who are being put at risk over their penmanship is senseless, especially given the enormity of reasons that a person’s signature can vary. Factors include age, physical and mental condition, disability, medication, stress, accidents, and inherent differences in a person's neuromuscular coordination and stance. Signature variants are more prevalent in people who are elderly, disabled, or who speak English as a second language.

A disproportionate amount of Georgia’s rejected ballots are coming from Gwinnett County, the state’s second largest, which is reportedly rejecting nearly one in 10 vote-by-mail ballots. Gwinnett is also one of the state’s most diverse counties, with African-Americans, Latinos, and Asians making up more than half the population. It’s also the only county in Georgia that is federally required to provide election materials in both English and Spanish.

Kemp — who is running for governor while serving as the chief election official for the state — is also the defendant in a different voting rights lawsuit which challenges Georgia’s exact-match system. It suspends voters if the information they enter on their registration form doesn’t exactly match their state driver’s license and Social Security records. As a result, more than 53,000 voter registration applications have been placed in “pending” status. Impacted voters should still be allowed to vote if they bring a qualifying identification to the polls, but it’s a position that they should not have been put in the first place.

With midterms just around the corner, and lawsuits filed on multiple fronts, Georgia should get the message: Signatures may vary, but due process and the constitutionally protected right to vote does not.


Every day across the nation, the ACLU is called on to defend all the freedoms guaranteed in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. There's never been a more important time for to support the ACLU and our effective work to protect civil liberties. If you like what you just read, help us continue to speak freely by donating today.

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diannemharris
5 days ago
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acdha
5 days ago
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Washington, DC
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Google and Uber

jwz
2 Comments and 12 Shares
How are these murderous sociopaths not in jail?

"If it is your job to advance technology, safety cannot be your No. 1 concern," Levandowski told me. "If it is, you'll never do anything. It's always safer to leave the car in the driveway. You'll never learn from a real mistake."

Levandowski had modified the cars' software so that he could take them on otherwise forbidden routes. A Google executive recalls witnessing Taylor and Levandowski shouting at each other. Levandowski told Taylor that the only way to show him why his approach was necessary was to take a ride together. The men, both still furious, jumped into a self-driving Prius and headed off.

The car went onto a freeway, where it travelled past an on-ramp. According to people with knowledge of events that day, the Prius accidentally boxed in another vehicle, a Camry. A human driver could easily have handled the situation by slowing down and letting the Camry merge into traffic, but Google's software wasn't prepared for this scenario. The cars continued speeding down the freeway side by side. The Camry's driver jerked his car onto the right shoulder. Then, apparently trying to avoid a guardrail, he veered to the left; the Camry pinwheeled across the freeway and into the median. Levandowski, who was acting as the safety driver, swerved hard to avoid colliding with the Camry, causing Taylor to injure his spine so severely that he eventually required multiple surgeries.

The Prius regained control and turned a corner on the freeway, leaving the Camry behind. Levandowski and Taylor didn't know how badly damaged the Camry was. They didn't go back to check on the other driver or to see if anyone else had been hurt. Neither they nor other Google executives made inquiries with the authorities. The police were not informed that a self-driving algorithm had contributed to the accident.

Levandowski, rather than being cowed by the incident, later defended it as an invaluable source of data, an opportunity to learn how to avoid similar mistakes. He sent colleagues an e-mail with video of the near-collision. Its subject line was "Prius vs. Camry." (Google refused to show me a copy of the video or to divulge the exact date and location of the incident.) He remained in his leadership role and continued taking cars on non-official routes.

According to former Google executives, in Project Chauffeur's early years there were more than a dozen accidents, at least three of which were serious. One of Google's first test cars, nicknamed kitt, was rear-ended by a pickup truck after it braked suddenly, because it couldn't distinguish between a yellow and a red traffic light. Two of the Google employees who were in the car later sought medical treatment. A former Google executive told me that the driver of the pickup, whose family was in the truck, was unlicensed, and asked the company not to contact insurers. kitt's rear was crushed badly enough that it was permanently taken off the road.

In response to questions about these incidents, Google's self-driving unit disputed that its cars are unsafe. "Safety is our highest priority as we test and develop our technology," a spokesperson wrote to me. [...]

As for the Camry incident, the spokesperson [said that] because Google's self-driving car did not directly hit the Camry, Google did not cause the accident.

These words actually came out of this creature's mouth, on purpose, when it knew that humans could hear it speaking:

"The only thing that matters is the future," [Levandowski] told me after the civil trial was settled. "I don't even know why we study history. It's entertaining, I guess -- the dinosaurs and the Neanderthals and the Industrial Revolution, and stuff like that. But what already happened doesn't really matter. You don't need to know that history to build on what they made. In technology, all that matters is tomorrow."

Previously, previously, previously, previously, previously.

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notadoctor
4 days ago
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Oakland, CA
popular
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diannemharris
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acdha
5 days ago
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Washington, DC
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mkalus
6 days ago
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W T F.
iPhone: 49.287476,-123.142136
jimwise
6 days ago
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😳

Timoclea

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  1. So the sourcing for this comes from two different works of Plutarch, which have subtle differences between them. I’ve basically chosen a mix of the two to make the most dramatic retelling, but I’m not making anything up. You’ll find links to my sources, as ever, at the bottom of this entry.
  2. The captain in question here was confusingly also named Alexander. I omitted his name for clarity’s sake. He was a Thracian conscript, not Macedonian (like Alexander was). Plutarch makes this very clear — “this was the act of those nasty alcoholic Thracians, not the virtuous Macedonians!”
  3. This is adapted from Plutarch saying that he flattered her and toyed with the possibility of treating her like a wife, while also threatening her.
  4. I am unclear how old she was supposed to be. No husband is mentioned — they usually are in these sorts of cases — and she’s just mentioned as having a brother who’d died in the fight against Alexander’s forces. I realized a little late that in one of the sources, Plutarch refers to her as a matron, but there’s no mention of her kids. I think she’s supposed to be a younger mom, and maybe her husband died in the invasion…? The invasion of Thebes was quite violent.
  5. Plutarch gives her a long speech in one of the versions, in which she flatters him back. This is an adaptation of that — basically, she says she wished she had died and that this day had never come, but now that it has, she has to be a dutiful woman and obey her man, and not withhold anything from him.
  6. In one version, she tricks him to walk down into the well. I prefer this version for obvious reasons.
  7. The servant on the left is modeled after Christina, one of the RP Patreon supporters! Thank you Christina!
  8. Timoclea’s servants only show up in one of the versions, but they do so to  help lugging over rocks with which to kill the dude.
  9. The timeline for this is a bit murky, but I think it all happened in one day.
  10. In  the background in the bottom panel, that’s Olympias of Macedon — Alexander’s mom — and Antipater, her nemesis. I cover her in book two. It’s a bit unlikely she would have been there to accompany him on his campaigns, but I wanted the throwback.
  11. Art error: her manacles were behind her back in the previous page, and in front of her on this one. Ugh. I’ll fix it later.
  12. Her speech is pretty true to what Plutarch recorded her as having said — however, she also leaned hard into the “do you know who I AM?” defense, making her class the central issue.
  13. This is a bit of an extrapolation of Alexander’s response. The histories said he was impressed by her demeanor and eloquence. Her freedom is a bit of a question mark — in one version, he says she and her family and free to go wherever they please, in the other he tells his men to look after her specially. I interpret this as her being no longer imprisoned and allowed around Thebes, but not outside of the walls. So in the context of this trial, she’s free to go (no longer shackled).
  14. The chamber he’s in is modeled after one on Crete. Most other depictions have him in a big tent with a lot of people standing around, but I really did not want to draw a crowd scene.
  15. This is a bit of a fudging, to keep the central point that I wanted to convey intact. When he says “no abuse like this,” it would mean that only the nobility are to be shown this level of consideration. The lower classes, presumably, were not shown nearly the same level of civility. Nevertheless, the point I wanted to get across was that Alexander, one of the most prominent rulers of Western history, was lauded in his own biography for believing a survivor of sexual assault, even one who didn’t like him very much, and treating her well. I thought that spoke to the moment we’re in.
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diannemharris
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hannahdraper
6 days ago
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Washington, DC
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I would vote for a “radical socialist kick boxing lesbian” in a flash

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Have you noticed how Republican insults are becoming a genuine mark of pride? Sharice Davids is running for Congress, and is getting some heat from local Republicans in Kansas.

Davids is a unique candidate for the 3rd Congressional District seat up for grabs this November. If elected, the Ho Chunk Nation member would be the first Native American woman elected to Congress in U.S. history and would also be the first gay Kansan to represent the state in Washington. She’s also a former MMA fighter and currently works as a lawyer, having obtained her law degree from Cornell. This election cycle, she may be at the top of a historic group of emboldened Native candidates, who happen to overwhelmingly be women.

She sounds awesome. Her existence prompted Michael Kalny, a two-bit racist precinct committeeman, to write to the head of the county Democratic Women chapter with this little rant.

Little Ms. Pritchett- you and your comrades stealth attack on Yoder is going to blow up in your leftist face. The REAL REPUBLICANS will remember what the scum DEMONRATS tried to do to Kavanaugh in November. Your radical socialist kick boxing lesbian will be sent back packing to the reservation!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

To quote Terry Pratchett, “And all those exclamation marks, you notice? Five? A sure sign of someone who wears his underpants on his head.” I’m not sure what he’d make of someone who used fifty exclamation marks.

Never forget. This is what Republicans are all about: racism, homophobia, misogyny, and oppression. That little pissant might get what he wants, now that the Supreme Court supports voter suppression laws that discriminate particularly severely against Indians, unless we all turn out the vote and kick these assholes back into the dead past.

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popular
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acdha
8 days ago
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Washington, DC
diannemharris
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angelchrys
8 days ago
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I'm in her district and I can't wait to cast my vote for her.
Overland Park, KS
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