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Alabama sheriff who supported Roy Moore accused of sex with underage girls

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Failed Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore was endorsed by Etowah County Sheriff Todd Entrekin despite numerous accusations of Moore’s inappropriate sexual behavior with minors. Now Entrekin has also been accused of having sex with underage girls.

AL.com, the publication that broke much of the news regarding Moore’s alleged sexual misconduct, reports Entrekin is under investigation after being accused of sexual misconduct at “drug-fueled parties he hosted for fellow law enforcement officers and other adult men in the early nineties.”

AL.com detailed the timeline of the accusations:

A 41-year-old woman first detailed the claims during several hours of in-person interviews with AL.com in May, during which she alleged that Entrekin had sex with her four times in the late summer of 1992, when he was 29 and she was 15 years old. In Alabama, the age of consent is 16.

Mary Elizabeth Cross said she also had sex with “two longtime Etowah County law enforcement officers who no longer work in the county” when she was a minor.

“I was 15. It was right before my 16th birthday, and I remember telling everyone I couldn’t wait to turn 16 so I could drive. We ended up at the lake house that night, and that’s where I had sex with Entrekin.”

Entrekin, who previously made headlines for pocketing $750,000 that was intended to feed inmates and buying a $740,000 beach house, denied the report on Friday:

“I’ve never had sex with any 15-year-old girl or had drugs around or anything. I have never done drugs in my life. That’s the most absurd thing I’ve ever heard of. Never, ever has anything like that happened before.”

Entrekin’s endorsement did not prevent Moore from losing an election in a state that President Donald Trump had won by nearly 30 percentage points in 2016. Following his upset loss, Moore lashed out at transgender people, liberal judges, and his opponent’s gay son. Even though Doug Jones (D-AL) is now a senator, Moore still hadn’t conceded as of February.




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diannemharris
9 hours ago
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The four-day work week is good for business

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After spending two months testing a 20% shorter week, a New Zealand company found its employees happier, more focused, and producing the same amount of work. Now they’re making the change permanent.

This spring, a New Zealand company tried a new experiment: Employees could work four standard days instead of five, but would be paid their usual salary. Newly released numbers from a study of the project, which lasted eight weeks, show that it worked. Workers’ sense of work-life balance went from 54% to 78%. Stress went down. And the missed hours didn’t affect job performance, which actually slightly improved.

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diannemharris
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Swallowing the elephant

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thedemoscene:

Rendering the full scene description for the island from Moana ( 70 GB of data on disk for a single frame).

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Part 5

This is a fantastic exploration of how to optimize really resource-intensive software. The memory footprint of the parsed data is completely insane.

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jepler
2 days ago
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not only is this a good read but so is http://pharr.org/matt/blog/2018/04/18/ispc-origins.html
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
diannemharris
2 days ago
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2 public comments
digdoug
2 days ago
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This is so awesome. And reminds me I'm not a REAL programmer.
Louisville, KY
gcarothers
2 days ago
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Optimization is fun 😁
Sebastopol, CA

Let's Not Do This

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Americans, we sure love our feel-good stories about living in a capitalist dystopia!

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acdha
1 day ago
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Washington, DC
diannemharris
2 days ago
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hannahdraper
2 days ago
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Washington, DC
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mareino
4 hours ago
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If anyone wants to start the new trendy baby shower gift of fomenting labor unrest to secure paid sick leave, I'll hop on that bandwagon!
Washington, District of Columbia

In Praise of Email

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Remember a decade or two ago when it was our national pastime to complain about email? More recently, as I’ve reassessed this blog, my social media presence, and our centralized digital platforms in general, I’ve come to realize just how much the email system got right, in spite of full inboxes, spam, and security issues. Despite, or perhaps because of, its early inception, email avoided many of the worst aspects of our modern media environment.

Let’s review:

  • Email is radically interoperable and universal.
  • You can have your own email address, using your own domain name, independent of any centralized service, and portable between providers. If you wish, you can also choose an email address at a centralized provider.
  • Regardless of provider, you can easily download all of your email onto your local computer or device. You can locally search your email archive; you are not beholden to any provider’s indexing system.
  • Identity on email is [username] at [domain name] rather than just a username that presumes that you are on a specific site or service. Leaving off the domain or service name prevents interoperability because of potential namespace confusion.
  • There are commonly implemented and generally respected standards and protocols for uploading, downloading, and syncing email between machines that are not under the control of a single entity.
  • Most email systems do not signal to others that you are online, and such signaling is not part of the email protocols themselves.
  • Filtering (e.g., spam filtering) is a separate system, and you can choose different filtering systems. Those filtering systems can do many things, including blocking, muting, suppressing images, sorting, and responding — all at the discretion of the user.
  • Although some email systems algorithmically sort email by priority or importance, that is not part of the email system itself. Again, this can be added, or not, by the user, and the default is strictly chronological.
  • The creation of groups (e.g., email listservs) is decentralized and yet effective.
  • You can attach files of any kind to an email, not just an image or video.
  • There are a wide range of clients to compose and read email, with features to match every style of interaction with the email system.
  • You can end-to-end encrypt email.
  • It is possible to have an email environment without distracting ads.

Compare that list with other, newer platforms we use today. I think it looks pretty darn good. Now think about structuring some of those platforms in the same way, and how much better they would be.



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diannemharris
4 days ago
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email ftw! I think about all these things every day. I also love that you can have plain text and/or html email.
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cjmcnamara
4 days ago
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hard to be unironic on the internet these days but here goes: i too love email
wtf
3 days ago
I miss email. How long has it been since you recieved an email written by a friend?

Our Broken Health Care System, Part the Infinity

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Well, this is infuriating.

On July 3, 1981, this newspaper wrote about a “rare cancer” killing gay men in New York and California. Though few knew it, what followed would be a generation-defining battle: for attention, for legitimacy, for our very lives. Today, after 37 years, we finally have a proven pathway to ending the AIDS epidemic in this country.

The only catch? Poor policy and pharmaceutical price-gouging have blocked the way, making critical drugs a luxury rather than an imperative.

The solution comes in a pill: Taken daily, Truvada, the brand name for a type of pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is up to 99 percent effective at preventing H.I.V. infection. Used as directed, it’s one of the most effective methods of preventing a viral infection ever discovered, as good as the polio vaccine, the miracle of modern medicine. When you combine PrEP’s effectiveness with the discovery that people living with H.I.V. cannot transmit the virus to others once they become undetectable, we could be on the verge of a swift end to the epidemic.

Truvada was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2012. But over six years later, the United States is failing miserably in expanding its use. Less than 10 percent of the 1.2 million Americans who might benefit from PrEP are actually getting it. The major reason is quite clear: pricing. With a list price over $20,000 a year, Truvada, the only PrEP drug available in the United States, is simply too expensive to become the public health tool it should be.

Gilead Sciences, the company that makes Truvada, maintains a monopoly on the drug domestically. In other countries, a one-month supply of generic Truvada costs less than $6, but Gilead charges Americans, on average, more than $1,600, a markup from the generic of 25,000 percent.

Infuriatingly, American taxpayers and private charities — not Gilead — paid for almost all of the clinical research used to develop Truvada as PrEP. Yet the price stays out of reach for millions, and will for at least several more years.

The disparities in PrEP access are astounding: Its use in black and Hispanic populations is a small fraction of that among whites. In the South, where a majority of H.I.V. infections occur, use is half what it is in the Northeast. Women use PrEP at drastically lower rates than men, and while there’s no national data on PrEP and transgender Americans, it’s almost certainly underused. The issue of PrEP access has become an issue of privilege.

But hey, what is more important in New Gilded Age health care than very rich people making even more money? Actually, I know the answer–it’s taxpayers funding the research that rich people make even more profit from and terrible racial and gendered disparities.

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acdha
3 days ago
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Washington, DC
hannahdraper
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Washington, DC
diannemharris
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